Endoplasmic Reticulum

There has been a recent explosion in the number of identified disorders linked to protein misfolding in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), resulting in ER entrapment of exportable proteins accompanied by the deterioration of cell and tissue function. We are exploring potential therapies including treatments designed to avoid ER protein folding overload, enhance endogenous ER chaperone activities, and promote ER-associated degradation of misfolded mutant proteins.  It is intended that such therapies will limit cell stress and cell death, and promote restoration of normal cell and tissue physiology.

Meeting Schedule

(all meetings are from 1:00 pm until 2:00 pm in 3515 BSRB)

March 8, 2017 – Amy Chang’s Lab
April 12, 2017 – Malini Raghavan’s Lab
May 10, 2017 – Billy Tsai’s Lab
June 14, 2017 – Ming Liu’s Lab
July 12, 2017 – Peter Arvan’s Lab

Co Directors

Peter Arvan

Peter Arvan

Peter Arvan is the William and Delores Brehm Professor of Diabetes Research, and Chief of the Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Diabetes (Depts. of Internal Medicine, and Molecular & Integrative Physiology). His laboratory uses cellular and mouse models to study protein folding and misfolding in pancreatic beta cells (proinsulin) and thyroid epithelial cells (thyroglobulin), in order to discover new treatments for conformational diseases that affect these cells of the endocrine system.  
Billy Tsai

Billy Tsai

Billy Tsai is the Corydon Ford Collegiate Professor of Cell and Developmental Biology. His laboratory is interested in how pathogens exploit a cellular quality control pathway to cause infection.

Members

Ling Qi

Ling Qi

Ling Qi is the Professor of Molecular & Integrative Physiology and Internal Medicine. His laboratory is broadly interested in the role of protein folding and degradation in endoplasmic reticulum and inflammation in human health and disease. They have recently generated new animal models recapitulating human obesity, type-1 diabetes and type-2 diabetes. Using cell biological, immunological and physiological tools, they strive to make discoveries and gain novel insights into the pathogenesis of human diseases. 
Les Satin

Les Satin

Les Satin is a Professor of Pharmacology, and Affiliate Professor of Medicine (MEND division). His laboratory uses fluorescence calcium imaging methods, novel optical probes, patch clamp electrophysiology, and mathematical modeling to study the cellular and molecular basis of beta cell metabolic and secretory function and diabetes.
Malini Raghavan

Malini Raghavan

Malini Raghavan is Professor of Microbiology and Immunology and faculty member in the Immunology, Cellular and Molecular Biology and Biophysics graduate programs. Her laboratory studies human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I polymorphisms and their influences on protein folding and immunity, and the biology of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) chaperones.
Amy Chang

Amy Chang

Amy Chang is an Associate Professor in the Department of Molecular, Cellular & Developmental Biology.  The Chang lab uses yeast as a model system to understand regulation of lipid homeostasis and the cellular consequences of lipid toxicity.
Ming Liu

Ming Liu

Ming Liu is the Adjunct Associate Professor of Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology & Diabetes. His laboratory focuses on studying early events of insulin biosynthesis and better understanding molecular mechanism of beta cell failure and diabetes caused by defects in insulin biosynthesis in hopes of identifying novel targets for diabetes intervention.
Andrew Lieberman

Andrew Lieberman

Andrew Lieberman is the Gerald Abrams Collegiate Professor of Pathology and Director of Neuropathology. His laboratory uses cellular and mouse models to study inherited forms of neurodegeneration in hopes of identifying targets for therapeutic intervention.
Jianming Li

Jianming Li